Russia hits out at ‘unacceptable’ US sanctions and warns of retaliation

Russia hits out at ‘unacceptable’ US sanctions and warns of retaliation Catherine Neilan Read This Next20 Stars Who’ve Posted Nude Selfies, From Lizzo to John Legend (Photos)The WrapIf You’re Losing Hair in This Specific Spot, It Might Be a Thyroid IssueVegamourTop 5 Tips If You’re Losing Your EyebrowsVegamourWhat Causes Hair Loss? Every Trigger ExplainedVegamourJim Cramer Calls for Billionaire Tax: ‘This Society Has to Start AddressingThe WrapSmoking and Hair Loss: Are They Connected?VegamourHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe WrapThis Is How Often You Should Cut Your HairVegamourRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe Wrap Thursday 9 August 2018 11:59 pm Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUndoZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldUndoinvesting.comThe Military Spent $1 Billion On this New Vehicle, And Here’s The First Lookinvesting.comUndomoneycougar.comDiana’s Butler Reveals Why Harry Really Married Meghanmoneycougar.comUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoTotal PastThis Woman’s Obituary Was So Harsh, Her Son Was Left ReelingTotal PastUndoOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutUndoGive It LoveThese Twins Were Named “Most Beautiful In The World,” Wait Until You See Them TodayGive It LoveUndoNoteableyFaith Hill’s Daughter Is Probably The Prettiest Woman In The WorldNoteableyUndo Share “The US administration has thrust all forces on complicating the situation further still,” she said, according to the Russian news agency Interfax.“The calculation of those behind the latest episode in the so-called Skripals case is simply obvious: to attempt, with all truths and untruths, to keep afloat this profitable [for them] anti-Russian subject as a tool of continuing to demonise Russia.”The Skripal case was a “pretext” for “new portions of restrictions”, she claimed.Earlier in the day, the Kremlin hit back at the “categorically unacceptable” measures, describing them as “absolutely illegal”. A spokesperson argued Russia “could not have any connection to the use of chemical weapons”.The intervention came as the rouble-dollar rate reached 66.3 on the Moscow Stock Exchange. On Tuesday, the rouble rate had stood at 63.4.The share prices of major Russian firms, including Aeroflot and Rusal, also fell today. whatsapp Russia is planning retaliatory measures against sanctions imposed by the US over the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal, which caused the rouble to fall to its lowest level since November 2016 today.Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said today that Moscow was starting to work on measures following Washing­ton’s decision to impose sanctions, which she claimed were using the Salisbury attacks in March as a pretext. whatsapp read more

Bird death reports are up In Homer, food sources possibly to blame

first_imgEnvironment | Southcentral | WildlifeBird death reports are up In Homer, food sources possibly to blameAugust 4, 2015 by Quinton Chandler, KBBI Share:The Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge is receiving multiple reports indicating a significant increase in dead and dying birds found on beaches in the Homer area over the last two weeks. The reports are coming from beach walkers and local citizen scientists dedicated to surveying seabird populations. Leslie Slater is the Gulf of Alaska Unit Biologist for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. She says the number of birds reported is in the dozens.Bishops Beach. (KBBI file photo)“So it’s hard to give a real exact number of the normal number. I would say on a given stretch of beach we normally don’t find more than one within a couple of miles stretch.”Slater says there are a lot of potential reasons for the increase in fatalities but the prevailing cause is likely tied to the birds’ food sources.“What we’re seeing more precisely is that birds seem to be starving. That’s sort of the ultimate cause of their deaths but something might be happening before that. We might be having a PSP (Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning) outbreak or another situation called domoic acid where these biotoxins can build up through the food chain and ultimately cause the deaths of these birds.”These deaths don’t seem to be isolated to Homer’s beaches. There are reports of similar deaths down the Alaska Peninsula and the eastern edge of the Aleutians. Slater says it’s possible they could be related to dead whales found near Kodiak. To narrow down causes of death Slater says the refuge will send carcasses of Homer’s birds to the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin.“There they have a whole team of expert epidemiologists and other wildlife disease specialists who will be able to examine them and probably come up with a real good conclusion.”Slater expects the center to receive the carcasses by the end of this week and believes there could be a reply within two weeks. She asks that people continue to call in dead birds with the species name and specific directions to the bodies’ location. She warns the public not to touch dead birds because they could be carrying disease. Share this story:last_img read more

More snow means moose move to roads

first_imgInterior | Southcentral | Transportation | WildlifeMore snow means moose move to roadsJanuary 24, 2017 by Dan Bross, KUAC-Fairbanks Share:(Photo via U.S. Fish and Wildlife)Recent heavy snow accumulation is pushing moose onto Alaska roads increasing collision danger.When snow piles up, you’re more likely to encounter moose on roads.Alaska Moose Federation Director Don Dyer said “along the Parks Highway from Big Lake to Talkeetna I counted 40 moose.”He saw the animals while driving the 50-mile stretch of highway last week.He said deep snow has moose moving to where the going is easier.”It’s tough for them to walk in the forest and the other areas, so they resort to walking on the roads,” Dyer said.Dyer said about 400 moose are killed by vehicles on Alaska roads every winter, most in the Kenai and Matanuska-Susitna areas but some in Fairbanks as well.The nonprofit Moose Federation salvages road kill moose and provides the meat to charities.Dyer said road kills have tracked a little under normal this winter, but numbers are increasing with the snowpack.“There’s been more activity in Fairbanks,” Dyer said. “Not as much as Mat-Su, but it’s definitely been an uptick in moose collisions.”Dyer said the situation could get worse if a crust forms on the snow, making it even more difficult for moose to get around.Share this story:last_img read more

The Last Romantic: Nature Meets Art in the Stunning Photos of…

first_imgPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićPhoto: Harun MehmedinovićGrowing up in Sarajevo during the Bosnian War, Harun Mehmedinović and his friends often made a game of daring each other to run across the wide empty boulevards known as “sniper alleys.” “I lost friends that way,” says Mehmedinović. “But as terrible and irrational as it sounds, it helped us stay sane. It was a way of rebelling against what was happening and trying to live in the moment.”A desire to escape the horrors of routine has shaped the 31-year-old filmmaker and photographer’s Bloodhoney* project, a series of portraits featuring Mehmedinović’s friends posed against stunning vistas in the great American landscape. Mehmedinović, who divides his time between Los Angeles and Flagstaff, where he teaches photography and film at Northern Arizona University, decided to compile the images in a coffee table book. The first title, Séance, came out earlier this year after one of the most successful Kickstarter campaigns ever. The next book, Persona, will be out in August 2014. “Whenever I visited my friends they complained about how their adult lives were chained to routine,” Mehmedinović says. “I suggested a photo shoot in which the setting would be determined by whoever I was shooting. They picked a location and I just went along with it.” Last April, Mehmedinović discussed his work in a TEDx talk, “Living in the Moment,” at Atlanta’s Emory University.Bloodhoney*, the literal translation of the Turkish word “Balkan,” is about breaking free of self-imposed restrictions and being present in the now. The subjects sometimes wear beautiful gowns, in other cases they’re completely naked. The models themselves, however, aren’t the most transfixing element of Mehmedinović’s images; instead, the viewer’s gaze is drawn to the compositional harmony between subject and nature. In one shot, a woman in a white dress is enveloped by a blizzard, her ghostly figure the focal point in a wintry landscape. Another shows a woman standing on a rock in the surf, her stance recalling a figure in one of Romantic painter Caspar David Friedrich’s works, which often depict a lone man contemplating his smallness in the face of nature.To call Mehmedinović a Romantic isn’t inaccurate; like the nineteenth-century artists and writers (Byron and Goethe among them) who fled civilization and embraced nature in search of a more authentic life, he has spent much of his time looking for new ways to connect with his surroundings. As a student at UCLA, he often took solitary road trips across the country, stopping only when the environment beckoned. “In Oklahoma I once saw a tornado up close. It was a surreal image. Looking in one direction the sky was clear and the sun was shining. When I turned my head, I saw a tornado come barreling across the flat land.” Mehmedinović stopped his car and got out his camera. “It was dangerous, but I just found it so appealing to entirely disconnect from being a modern human being.”Abandoning the structures of everyday life has been transformative for Mehmedinović and his subjects. “We did a shoot in an old bunker in Virginia, close to Mount Vernon,” he says. “I asked the model if she had any dilemmas in her life, and she explained that she had married a man she didn’t love in deference to her parents. She said it was like being a prisoner in her own body.” The bunker, which had previously been occupied by squatters, was filthy and reeked of human waste. “When the model saw it she said, ‘I love it. I want to do the shoot naked,’” Mehmedinović says. “When I saw the photos afterwards, I understood. That space perfectly expressed how she felt about her marriage.” Another shoot involved venturing out onto the ice of Boston’s frozen Charles River. “When we got back to shore I threw a rock and it crashed right through the ice,” Mehmedinović says. “People watching us probably thought we were insane, but it was quite beautiful, one of those rare moments where you’re able to completely take your life into your own hands.”While Séance focused on the process itself—following the models around for hours at a time, allowing them space to find themselves in front of the camera—the second book, Persona, will center on how Mehmedinović’s subjects perform their own identities. “I would ask the models to come as they were but many showed up in a favorite dress or other items that functioned as a kind of mask,” he explains. “I found this layer interesting and decided to focus on it.”The beauty of impulse is the organizing principle for Mehmedinović’s work. “People are miserable because they never get a chance to show who they are,” he says. “You have to be able to lose yourself sometimes and forget about time and all the other things that order your life. You have to embrace chaos.” TAGSBloodhoneyHarun MehmedinovićKickstarterL.A. CulturePhotographySéancePrevious articleRing in the New Year with a Feast of King RobertNext articleRetail 911: Three Shopping Emergencies, SolvedTheis Duelund RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORA Glimpse at the People and Cars of L.A.’s Lowrider Scene‘I’ve Got Nothing More to Hide’: Polly Borland Puts Her Nude Selfies on DisplayLast March, a Photographer Chartered a Helicopter and Captured an Invisible Crisis UncategorizedThe Last Romantic: Nature Meets Art in the Stunning Photos of Harun MehmedinovićWith Bloodhoney* the photographer shatters the monotony of everyday life and tempts fate as a matter of principle.By Theis Duelund – December 23, 20131243ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItlast_img read more

NASAA advises caution on cryptocurrency investments

first_img welcomia/123RF Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news “Cryptocurrencies and investments tied to them are high-risk products with an unproven track record and high price volatility. Combined with a high risk of fraud, investing in cryptocurrencies is not for the faint of heart,” he adds.Indeed, a survey of securities regulators found that 94% believe that there is a “high risk of fraud” involving cryptocurrencies, NASAA says. It adds that “regulators also were unanimous in their view” that this currently unregulated space needs more regulation to ensure investor protection.Last month, NASAA singled out cryptocurrency-related investments and initial coin offerings as emerging investor threats for 2018. The Canadian Securities Administrators and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) have also issued investor warnings in the past month.Read: CSA warns of risks associated with cryptocurrency futures“Investors should go beyond the headlines and hype to understand the risks associated with investments in cryptocurrencies, as well as cryptocurrency futures contracts and other financial products where these virtual currencies are linked in some way to the underlying investment,” Borg says.SEC officials endorsed NASAA’s warning. In a statement published Thursday, Jay Clayton, SEC chairman, along with commissioners Kara Stein and Michael Piwowar, called the alert, “a timely and thoughtful reminder to Main Street investors to exercise caution.”“The NASAA release also reminds investors that when they are offered and sold securities they are entitled to the benefits of state and federal securities laws, and that sellers and other market participants must follow these laws. Unfortunately, it is clear that many promoters of ICOs and others participating in the cryptocurrency-related investment markets are not following these laws,” the SEC statement warns.“The SEC and state securities regulators are pursuing violations, but we again caution you that, if you lose money, there is a substantial risk that our efforts will not result in a recovery of your investment,” it adds. How should banks allocate capital for crypto? James Langton Keywords Investor protection,  CryptoassetsCompanies North American Securities Administrators Association New York attorney general secures receiver for crypto firm Citing the continuing headlines and hype around cryptocurrencies, the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) on Thursday reminded retail investors to be cautious about cryptocurrency-related investments.“The recent wild price fluctuations and speculation in cryptocurrency-related investments can easily tempt unsuspecting investors to rush into an investment they may not fully understand,” says Joseph Borg, president of NASAA and director of the Alabama Securities Commission, in a statement. Bitcoin should face tough capital rules, Basel Committee says Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Are aging parents a financial burden for Canadians?

first_img Research finds retirees curb spending to preserve assets Poor couple sitting on the couch and counting money Katarzyna Białasiewicz/123RF Keywords Retirement,  EldercareCompanies FP Canada Many Canadians are worried about the financial strain of supporting their elderly parents, according to a survey commissioned by FP Canada and Chartwell Retirement Residences.The survey, conducted by Leger, polled more than 1,500 Canadians. Fourteen percent of respondents who had a living parent said they expect to postpone their retirement to financially care for them. Twelve percent said supporting their parents would prevent them from paying off debt. In contrast, only 5% and 8%, respectively, confirmed that financially being there for their parents has resulted in those scenarios. Related news Most Canadians aren’t planning for long-term care costs: survey Mature single women are wealthier than mature single men, StatsCan finds Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter IE Staff Still, 13% of respondents said they have taken time off work to care for their parents, and 5% said they have had to quit their jobs. A press release notes that women were more likely than men to have taken time off work (15%, compared to 10%).Canadians aged 18 to 34 are the most concerned about the financial implications of caring for elderly parents, with 18% expecting to postpone their retirement, the release adds.The survey also found that many Canadians are unaware of various forms of financial assistance available to them to help them care for aging parents.Only 28% said they’re familiar with tax credits associated with dependent parents—the press release says men were more likely than women to be aware of these credits (31%, compared to 24%). Only 22% of all respondents knew about grants, loans and rebates that are associated with renovating homes to accommodate elderly parents.Read the full survey here.last_img read more

Hearings to examine climate change bills

first_imgHearings to examine climate change bills The House of Representatives Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy is holding public hearings for its inquiry into climate change bills on Friday 29 January and Monday 1 February 2021.The two private members’ Bills were introduced in Parliament by Zali Steggall MP on 9 November 2020, and referred to the Committee for review.The Bills seek to alter Australia’s current climate change management and establish a new Climate Change Commission to replace the current Climate Change Authority.Committee Chair Mr Ted O’Brien said: “The Committee will consider the Bills carefully and we’re looking forward to hearing the views of a range of interested parties.”Acknowledging a high level of interest in the inquiry, Mr O’Brien noted the Committee’s experience in managing inquiries on issues of important public policy. “We have recently managed inquiries into nuclear energy, bushfires, Scope 3 emissions and feral cats, and so the Committee is well placed to now deliberate on the proposed climate change bills. “As a Committee, we’ll do what we always do,” said Mr O’Brien. “We won’t draw any conclusions prematurely, but rather assess the information with dispassionate independence.”The Committee will commence its hearing on Friday with the key Australian Government agencies managing Australia’s current climate change framework.The hearing will then consider views from the health, science, technical, environmental, infrastructure, energy, planning, business and investment sectors.On Monday, the Committee will hear from some state and local government bodies and others including grassroots community groups, policy development organisations, academics and legal experts.Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, committee hearings are not presently open for physical attendance by members of the public. Proceedings will be available to watch live or later on the Parliament’s website at aph.gov.au/live.Public hearing detailsDate: Friday 29 January 2021Time: 9.30 am to 4.45 pmLocation: Via video and teleconferenceDate: Monday 1 February 2021Time: 11.00 am to 5.00 pmLocation: Via video and teleconference /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, bushfires, business, climate change, Commission, community, coronavirus, environment, Government, infrastructure, Investment, pandemic, parliament, sciencelast_img read more

Darlington Carranballac Road Upgrade Gets Underway

first_imgDarlington Carranballac Road Upgrade Gets Underway Local farmers will be the key winners from the reconstruction of Darlington Carranballac Road which is now underway, helping them to get their products to market.Ararat Rural City Council Mayor, Cr Jo Armstrong visited the site this week to see the pulverising of the old road base.“Darlington Carranballac Road is one of the many roads in the Ararat Rural City, which are used as important linkage roads for farmers to receive inputs and get produce to market,” Cr Jo Armstrong said.The $558,000 upgrade has been funded through the Australian Government’s Roads to Recovery Program, delivering a complete reconstruction and installation of table drainage for a 1.2km section of road to the north of Pura Pura. Existing culvert crossings will also be replaced as part of the project.“First and last mile freight routes are vital to support our local agriculture industry which rely on them every day to move large volumes of freight.”“The funding from the Australian Government is critical in allowing Council to create better connections for locals and industry, as well as providing important economic opportunities for our region.”The condition of the existing road surface has been a point of frustration for many locals and truck drivers. The existing road was only about five metres wide and has deteriorated from years of heavy vehicles using the road through the harvest season.Ararat Rural City Council CEO, Dr Tim Harrison expressed the benefits that the road will have once construction is complete and extended his thanks to those impacted for their patience.“The redeveloped road will be over a metre wider than before and have a deeper road base. This will allow for easier two-way traffic and cope with the pressures caused by heavy vehicle traffic through the harvest season,” Dr Harrison said.Construction will be completed in the coming months, during this time there will be some minor delays, which are being communicated to those affected.“Local road users are eager to have the reconstruction completed have been very welcoming to our construction team.“Ararat Rural City Council would like the thank the locals of Pura Pura and all of those who rely on the road for their patience while the project is being completed.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Ararat, Ararat Rural City Council, armstrong, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, council, Darlington, Government, industry, local council, market, project, season, truck, vehiclelast_img read more

CU honors graduates during a soggy ceremony on May 9

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: May 12, 2015 A heavy downpour didn’t dampen enthusiasm on Saturday, May 9, as CU-Boulder honored candidates for 5,927 degrees during an abbreviated spring commencement ceremony. Cathleen Black, a former media executive and author, gave a shortened speech to the graduates and their families.The planned graduation speeches from Chancellor DiStefano and Black were cut short due to the weather. The presentation videos from the Senior Class and for our Honorary Degree recipients were also not shown. Please click the links below to enjoy these items produced to help our graduates celebrate their special day. Click here for the Chancellor’s remarks Click here for Black’s address Click here to view the Senior Class video Click here to view the video on honorary degree recipient John Darrah Click here to view the video on honorary degree recipients Peter and Joan Balsells Click here to view the video on honorary degree recipient Richard Jessorlast_img read more

Doctors nudged by overdose letter prescribe fewer opioids

first_imgHomeFeaturedDoctors nudged by overdose letter prescribe fewer opioids Aug. 10, 2018 at 5:00 amFeaturedNewsDoctors nudged by overdose letter prescribe fewer opioidsAssociated Press3 years agoapNews In a novel experiment, doctors got a letter from the medical examiner’s office telling them of their patient’s fatal overdose. The response: They started prescribing fewer opioids.Other doctors, whose patients also overdosed, didn’t get letters. Their opioid prescribing didn’t change.More than 400 “Dear Doctor” letters, sent last year in San Diego County, were part of a study that, researchers say, put a human face on the U.S. opioid crisis for many doctors.“It’s a powerful thing to learn,” said University of Southern California public policy researcher Jason Doctor, lead author of the paper published Thursday in the journal Science.Researchers used a state database to find 861 doctors, dentists and others who had prescribed opioids and other risky medications to 170 people who died of an overdose involving prescription medicines. Most states have similar databases to track prescribing of dangerous drugs, where doctors can check patients’ previous prescriptions.Most of the deaths involved opioid painkillers, many taken in combination with anti-anxiety drugs. On average, each person who died had filled prescriptions for dangerous drugs from five to six prescribers in the year before they died.Half the prescribers received letters that began: “This is a courtesy communication to inform you that your patient (name, date of birth) died on (date). Prescription drug overdose was either the primary cause of death or contributed to the death.”The letters offered guidance for safer prescribing. The tone was supportive: “Learning of your patient’s death can be difficult. We hope that you will take this as an opportunity” to prevent future deaths.Then the researchers watched what happened over three months.Letter recipients reduced their average daily opioid prescribing — measured in a standard way, morphine milligram equivalents — by nearly 10 percent compared to prescribers who didn’t get letters. Opioid prescribing in the no-letter group didn’t change.Recipients put fewer new patients on opioids than those who didn’t get letters. They wrote fewer prescriptions for high-dose opioids.The strategy is original, helpful and could be duplicated elsewhere, said pain medicine expert Dr. David Clark of Stanford University, who wasn’t involved in the study. He was surprised the letter’s effect wasn’t larger.“It may have been easy for physicians to feel it was somebody else prescribing who got the patient in trouble,” Clark said, adding that changing even one patient’s care takes time, requiring “very difficult conversations.”Opioid prescribing has been declining in the U.S. for several years in response to pressure from health systems, insurers and regulators.Yet deaths keep rising. Nearly 48,000 Americans died of opioid overdoses last year, according to preliminary numbers released last month, a 12 percent increase from a year before.Now illegal fentanyl, another opioid, is the top killer, surpassing pain pills and heroin. Lead author Doctor said reducing the number of prescribed opioids will, over time, close off a gateway to illicit drugs by shrinking the pool of dependent people.The study didn’t analyze whether the deaths were caused by inappropriate prescribing or whether the prescribing changes resulted in patients doing better or worse.That’s a flaw in an otherwise careful study, said addiction researcher Dr. Stefan Kertesz of University of Alabama at Birmingham, who has raised red flags about policies that cause doctors to take patients off opioids too fast and without a plan for treating addiction.Patients can fall into despair or contemplate suicide if they are involuntarily tapered off opioids without support, he said.“What actually happens to patients should be our concern, rather than just making a number go down,” Kertesz said.Study co-author Dr. Roneet Lev, chief of emergency medicine at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, discovered her own name in the data.Lev prescribed 15 opioid pain pills to an ER patient with a broken eye socket, without knowing the patient got 300 painkillers from another doctor a day earlier. Lev didn’t get a “Dear Doctor” letter because the patient’s death fell outside the timeline of the study, July 2015-June 2016.Still, she felt the impact and believes she could have done better. Said Lev: “It was an opportunity to look at all the records on that patient and say, ‘Wow, I’m really worried about you.’”Tags :apNewsshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentProposed rule would define rent control tenants as “human beings” to oust corporationsBoys & Girls Clubs of Santa Monica Receives $200,000 Grant from OneWest BankYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall9 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson20 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter20 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor20 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press20 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press20 hours agolast_img read more