Well-known community activist laid to rest

first_img Laois County Council create ‘bigger and better’ disability parking spaces to replace ones occupied for outdoor dining Pinterest Well-known community activist laid to rest Laois County Council team up with top chef for online demonstration on tips for reducing food waste Rugby WhatsApp Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSDonal KeenanMountmellick Home News Community Well-known community activist laid to rest NewsCommunity Twitter Community Pinterest Previous articleWATCH: Great excitement as Scoil Bhríde is officially openedNext articleSix Portlaoise creations make the cut for Junk Kouture regional finals David PowerA journalist for over 20 years, David has worked for a number of regional titles both as journalist and editor. From Tullamore he also works as a content editor for Independent.ie. His heroes include Shane Lowry, Seamus Darby and Johnny Flaherty Twitter By David Power – 9th February 2018 Council WhatsApp The late Donal Keenan A well-known Mountmellick community activist was laid to rest in his native town earlier today.Donal Keenan served with the Irish Defence Forces for 40 years, where he worked as a chef.He was a common sight, staging weekly protests against water charges in O’Connell Square in the town.He contested the local elections  in Laois in 2014 as an independent candidate.His sister Imelda Keenan has been missing since 1994, when she was last seen in Waterford.The Keenan family continues to search for answers on her disappearance.Mr Keenan’s life-long friend Brian Furlong paid tribute to him on social media.Donal was a community activist and very opposed to water charges, and the quality of our public water supply. I spent two years holding a weekly awareness raising protest in O’Connell Square Mountmellick with Donal and others.“I tried to get Donal to join the Anti Austerity Alliance but he was a committed Independent. He told me ‘I spent 40 years following orders never again’. Donal was also our excellent treasurer in the Mountmellick 1916 – 2016 Easter Commemoration Committee. He threw himself 100% into any project or campaign he was involved in. The 1916 – 2016 Easter Commemoration Garden at Derrycloney Bridge Mountmellick is part of Donal’s legacy. Condolences to Donal’s Wife and children and extended family,” Mr Furlong said.Pre-deceased by his dear parents Flor & Liz & brother Ned, he is deeply regretted by his loving wife Cheryl, his son Daniel, and daughters Samantha and Elizabeth, grandchildren Darren & Tadgh, brothers and sisters, uncles and aunts, nieces and nephews, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, neighbours, relatives, former army colleagues and many friends.His funeral arrived to  St. Joseph’s Church, Mountmellick earlier today (Friday) for 12 noon Requiem Mass. Burial took place after in St. Joseph’s Cemetery.SEE ALSO – Funding of €3.1 million announced for Mountmellick flood defence Facebook Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squadlast_img read more

Fr Paddy: Saint John Henry Newman, a wonderful saint

first_img TAGSFr PaddyFr Paddy Byrne Fr Paddy: Saint John Henry Newman, a wonderful saint By Fr Paddy – 12th October 2019 GAA Twitter Originally an Anglican priest, he converted to Catholicism in 1845  and his writings are considered among some of the most important Church-writings in recent centuries.Ordained a Catholic priest in 1847, he was made a cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in 1879, although he was not a bishop.Newman’s conversion to the Catholic faith was controversial in England, and resulted in him losing many friends, including his own sister who never spoke to him again.The British cardinal founded the Oratory of St. Philip Neri in England and was particularly dedicated to education, founding two schools for boys.He died in Birmingham in 1890 at the age of 89. In October, Cardinal Newman will become Britain’s first new saint since the canonization of St. John Ogilvie in 1976.At Newman’s beatification Mass in Birmingham, England in September 2010, Pope Benedict XVI said that Newman’s“insights into the relationship between faith and reason, into the vital place of revealed religion in civilized society, and into the need for a broadly-based and wide-ranging approach to education were not only of profound importance for Victorian England, but continue today to inspire and enlighten many all over the world.”“What better goal could teachers of religion set themselves than Blessed John Henry’s famous appeal for an intelligent, well-instructed laity: ‘I want a laity, not arrogant, not rash in speech, not disputatious, but men who know their religion, who enter into it, who know just where they stand, who know what they hold and what they do not, who know their creed so well that they can give an account of it, who know so much of history that theycan defend it,” Pope Benedict said.The first miracle attributed to Newman’s intercession involved the complete and inexplicable healing of a deacon from a disabling spinal condition.His second miracle concerned the healing of a pregnant American woman. The woman prayed for the intercession of Cardinal Newman at the time of a life-threatening diagnosis, and her doctors have been unable to explain how or why she was able to suddenly recover.“God has created me to do Him some definite service. He has committed some work to me which He has not committed to another. I have my mission. I may never know it in this life, but I shall be told it in the next.I am alink in a chain, a bond of connection between persons,” Blessed John Henry Newman wrote.“He has not created me for naught. I shall do good; I shall do His work. I shall be an angel of peace, a preacher oftruth in my own place, while not intending it if I do but keep His commandments,” he said.Lead Kindly lightIn 1833, the young theologian and Anglican vicar John Henry Newman (1801-90) was traveling in the Mediterranean when he was struck down by a fever that nearly killed him.“My servant thought I was dying and begged for my last directions,” he recalled in his autobiography.“I gave them as he wished, but I said, ‘I shall notdie, for I have not sinned against light,’ Newman recovered slowly, but felt desperately homesick.On the way back to England, he took an orange boat from Palermo to Marseilles which was becalmed in the Straits of Bonifacio.Thus stranded, in an exhausted and emotional state, Newman was impelled to write this verse as a meditative poem called ‘The Pillar of the Cloud’, expressive of his longing for consoling Christian certainties in an age of mounting doubt.There has been much puzzlement over the nature of the ‘kindly light’ and the identity of the lost ‘angel faces’ inthe last line.When challenged on these points, Newman replied crisply, “I am not bound to remember my own meaning.”He was displeased when the poem was turned into a hymn in 1845 – by which time he had converted to Catholicism, where congregational hymn-singing formed no part of divine service.To no avail, his words embodied the maudlin spirit of the age, to the point at which Queen Victoria asked it to be read to her as she lay dying.It was also the last hymn to be sung on the Titanic – not, as is sometimes said, as the liner was actually sinking, but at the final service given on board by the chaplain on the afternoon before the disaster.Personally I pray this beautiful hymn every night after night prayer…Lead, kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom, lead thou me on;The night is dark, and I am far from home, lead thou me on.Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see, the distant scene; one step enough for me.I was not for ever thus, nor prayed that thou, shouldst lead me on;I loved to choose and see my path; but now, lead thou me on,I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears, pride ruled my will: remember not past years.So long thy power hath blessed me, sure it still, will lead me on,O’er moor and fen, o’er crag and torrent, till the night is gone;And with the morn those angel faces smile, which I have loved long since, and lost awhile.Prayer of Saint Henry NewmanO Lord, support us all the day long, until the shadows lengthen and the evening comes, and the busy world is hushed, and the fever of life is over and our work is done.Then, Lord, in your mercy, grant us a safe lodging, a holy rest, and peace at the last, through Christ Jesus, ourLord. AmenSEE ALSO – Fr Paddy: An ‘Extraordinary Mercy’ – ‘I give you the power of the keys’ Twitter This Sunday, October 13 2019 will be canonized on October 13 2019, in Rome.Pope Francis decreed that Newman and four other blesseds will be canonized together in St. Peter’s Square.Indian Sister Marian Thresia, founder of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Family, Italian Sister Giuseppina Vannini, Brazilian Sister Dulce Lopes Pontes, and Marguerite Bays, a Swiss consecrated virgin of the Third Order of St. Francis will becanonized alongside Newman.Their canonizations take place during the Special Synod of Bishops from the Pan-Amazonian region to be held at the Vatican October 6-27.Newman was a 19th century theologian, poet, Catholic priest and cardinal. Facebook Facebook Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results WhatsAppcenter_img GAA Pinterest GAA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Home Columnists Fr Paddy: Saint John Henry Newman, a wonderful saint Columnists Previous articleFootball success now the focus in the incredible sporting career of Niall RigneyNext articleFlower power boost for pollinators on Laois roads Fr PaddyFr Paddy is a curate in the hugely vibrant Portlaoise Parish. From Carlow town, he was educated in Carlow CBS and studied Business and Politics in Trinity College Dublin before training to be a priest in Carlow College.He is the youngest priest in the Kildare & Leighlin diocese and writes for a number of media outlets. He has almost 14,000 followers on Twitter. Pinterest Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory WhatsApp 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

Moment in Time: School days in The Heath NS in 2000

first_img Moment in Time: School days in The Heath NS in 2000 TAGS2000Moment in TimeThe HeathThe Heath NS By LaoisToday Reporter – 4th April 2021 Previous articleCoronavirus: Three further deaths and 457 new casesNext articleDeaths in Laois – Monday, April 5, 2021 LaoisToday Reporter Twitter SEE ALSO – Check out more local photos and stories from the year 2000 here Talk and memories of school days always bring out the nostalgic side in all of us.And the photographic series that Alf Harvey carried out in 2000 and 2001 for the Nationalist newspaper really captured some gems as he visited schools all over the county.In March of 2000, he visited The Heath, then a three-teacher school under principal John Dunne.And as always he got some great photos.From students painting and playing to posing happily in big group class photos, it was a typical day in school for a very content-looking student body. Twitter Over 20 years later no doubt those present look back fondly.Though not as fresh faced now, most now aged from their mid 20s to early to mid 30s.But these photos will put a smile on the faces again all those years later.You can check them out in full below. WhatsApp Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival Facebook Home We Are Laois Moment in Time Moment in Time: School days in The Heath NS in 2000 We Are LaoisMoment in Time Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Electric Picnic Pinterest Pinterest Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months WhatsApp Council Electric Picnic last_img read more

Roots of Christmas tree shortage trace back to financial crisis

first_img Consumers on the hunt for a Christmas tree have little to cheer about this year, as prices are through the roof due to a shortage of trees that can be traced back to the 2008 financial crisis.The Great Recession put thousands of American Christmas tree farmers out of business, resulting in far fewer seedlings being planted. As trees have a maturity cycle of 10 years, the lack of supply is just now beginning to bite, pushing up U.S. demand for Canadian Christmas trees and causing higher prices for consumers across the continent. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Holiday,  Economic indicators Leading indicators signal steady rebound: OECD Christopher ReynoldsCanadian Press “We’ve got a shortage of Christmas trees,” said analyst Paul Quinn of RBC Dominion Securities. “We’ve seen a marked increase in the price for trees because of the lack of supply.”The average price of a tree rose 123% to US$78 in 2018 from US$35 in 2013, according to the U.S. National Christmas Tree Association. Price growth has also occurred in Canada, Quinn said, with sales at Christmas tree farms up by 15% annually for the last five years on average.The Quinn Farm on Perrot Island, just outside Montreal, boosted retail prices by $10 this year.Part of the reason was to make up for a decade of stable pricing and rising labour costs, but demand has been growing steadily for the past few years — with a sharp spurt this year — said Stephanie Quinn (no relation to Paul Quinn), who runs the nursery with her husband Phil.Their top-price Tannenbaums now cost $80 while bargain timber goes for $55, with the price dependent on quality, species and height.“We’ve been getting a fair number of calls from people who normally buy wholesale trees and haven’t been able to find anybody this year,” said Quinn, echoing other direct-to-consumer farmers.“And we tried calling around to find some plantations and Christmas tree growers that could supply us — we even sent the request out with Quebec’s Christmas tree producers association — and there was nobody who had any extra trees to sell.”The head of that association, Jimmy Downey, says consumers unwilling to shell out more than last year may have to settle for a tree that’s shorter, scragglier or a notch below the “Cadillac” varieties.“Pines don’t smell good. They smell awful, actually, and they lose their needles very vast,” said Downey, whose third-generation farm in Hatley, Que., sells up to 30,000 trees each year.The Balsam fir is fragrant but its deluxe cousin the Fraser fir is hardier, shedding fewer needles and sporting sturdier branches that can handle a heavy ornament.About 80% of Downey’s trees go by the truckload to the U.S., mainly New England but as far as Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. He raised prices this year, thanks largely to the short supply and strong demand.Supply is lower in Canada too, owing largely to past farm closures. The Canadian Christmas Tree Growers Association — Downey sits on the board alongside his father, executive director Lewis Downey — counted roughly 300 members 15 years ago, he said. Now the trade group is down to about 80.With a shortage plaguing the U.S., Western Canadian consumers may find they’re paying significantly more for the trees they buy from Oregon and Washington.“B.C. is not a high-producing province for Christmas trees,” Downey said. “The Fraser Valley is very, very expensive and it takes too many years to produce a tree. Therefore you might as well produce something that will give you a yield on a yearly basis.”Factors beyond the financial crisis are also having an impact.“We’ve had two very dry summers, which means the trees just don’t grow as fast,” said Stephanie Quinn. “Or they look very bare and didn’t fill in.”Greater awareness among customers of their carbon footprint may be sparking renewed interest in natural trees, which often grow locally and meet their demise organically by returning to the earth as mulch, experts say.Artificial trees, available in big-box stores across the country after a journey from China, are typically not recyclable and are manufactured with PVC, which releases carcinogens during manufacturing and disposal. However, the fake firs still furnish more than 70% of the U.S. market, according to RBC Dominion Securities.Paul Quinn suspects the supply shortage will remain for at least a couple years.“As the economics get better for tree growers you’ll see them planting more trees. Unfortunately, you had to have that foresight 10 years ago,” he said.Quinn himself sidesteps the problem entirely, applying each year for a permit from the B.C. government to harvest a tree on Crown land.“It always involves almost swimming through the snow to get to the base of the tree to cut it,” he said. Family selecting Christmas tree. Kids choosing freshly cut Norway Xmas tree at outdoor lot. Children buying gifts at winter fair. Boy and girl shopping for Christmas decoration at market. Holiday time 123RF Household debt-to-income ratio fell in first quarter: Statscan Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news Economy lost 68,000 jobs in Maylast_img read more

New Exciting Facilities Coming for Cell Phone Users

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Government is opening up new business opportunities by providing licenses to allow service providers to roll out wireless-based services to Jamaicans.Minister with responsibility for Information, Telecommunications and Special Projects in the Office of the Prime Minister, Daryl Vaz in his contribution to the Sectoral debate in Parliament on Wednesday (July 22), announced that a wireless broadband licence has been issued to Digicel that would provide wider choices to a greater number of consumers. Government is also offering two wireless cable licences to facilitate greater choices to consumers.Mr. Vaz noted that the mobile phone has become the most phenomenally successful access device spanning all social and economic strata. With the introduction of the new wireless-based services, users will literally be able to carry their business in their pockets through the cell phone. The new services he said, would allow users to access their e-mail, internet, converse, watch television and movies, engage in video conferences, record videos and remotely monitor activities in their offices or from their homes.Mr. Vaz said the Information and Telecommunications Policy is to be presented to the Parliament shortly. This would help to build confidence around the use of mobile applications, provide the environment for persons to seize new opportunities and allow service providers and regulators, the platform on which to institute measures that enhance security and mitigate breaches. Advertisements New Exciting Facilities Coming for Cell Phone Users Office of the Prime MinisterJuly 24, 2009 RelatedNew Exciting Facilities Coming for Cell Phone Userscenter_img RelatedNew Exciting Facilities Coming for Cell Phone Users RelatedNew Exciting Facilities Coming for Cell Phone Userslast_img read more

River upstream awash with floating hyacinth

first_imgRiver upstream awash with floating hyacinth Rockhampton Regional Council is encouraging boaties to keep an eye on the river, as beds of aquatic weeds begin to float downstream.Planning and Regulatory Councillor Ellen Smith said that the hyacinth will once again make its way down the river following considerable rainfall in the upper catchment areas.“We are already seeing quite a lot of build up above the barrage and there is a lot further upstream,” Cr Smith said.“We encourage boat owners to be cautious while launching, and to ensure any boats moored in the river are monitored closely by their owners for the possible build-up of weeds.“Hyacinth needs freshwater to survive and will eventually die off when it reaches the salt water, but it is important to be vigilant and watch your vessels closely.“While Council is proactive in managing the weeds, there are limitations to controlling the amount that moves downstream.“We do our absolute best to manage the hyacinth in our immediate local government area, but of course the challenge is that with such a long river system we can only do so much.“Council manages the hyacinth using an approved chemical treatment spray as well as a successful biocontrol program which utilises a certain species of weevils to combat the growth of pest plants that are damaging native ecosystems and affecting water flow.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:boat, Chemical, council, Government, local council, planning, Rockhampton, Rockhampton Regional Council, species, treatment, Waterlast_img read more

Metropolitan Performing Arts presents ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’

first_imgName*Email*Website Name*Email*Website Metropolitan Performing Arts presents ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’Posted by Jacob GrannemanDate: Tuesday, December 3, 2019in: Peopleshare 0 Vancouver-based nonprofit theater company is bringing the 1965 holiday classic to lifeVANCOUVER — Christmas is on the horizon, and in the spirit of the holidays Metropolitan Performing Arts (MPA) will delight audiences with a production of “A Charlie Brown Christmas.”Based on the beloved TV special from 1965, the performances will feature all the same iconic songs and scenes, as well as a cast-lead holiday carol concert. The cast of the play are a part of the MPA Musical Theater Program, and are young thespians entering the world of theater.“It’s a very classic story. They’re fun characters for the kids to explore and create on stage,” said MPA Executive Director, Barbara Richardson. “Now that we’re in our new space, and we have our own performance venue, we’re going to be able to do more community theater shows. That was the struggle in the past and why we haven’t done one recently in the regular school year.” From left to right, actor Emerson Skogen as Linus, actress Norah Skogen as Lucy, actor Jaedon Moore as Charlie Brown, and actress Caroline Gienapp as Snoopy. Photo courtesy of Metropolitan Performing Arts From left to right, actor Emerson Skogen as Linus, actress Norah Skogen as Lucy, actor Jaedon Moore as Charlie Brown, and actress Caroline Gienapp as Snoopy. Photo courtesy of Metropolitan Performing Arts Preview performances will be at the MPA theater in Vancouver from Dec. 5 through 7, with a 7 p.m. performance each day, and a matinee show on Saturday at 2 p.m. General and VIP tickets are available as advance tickets, and cost $12 to $14. All tickets can be purchased online at www.metropolitanperfomingarts.org. The main performances will be hosted at The Brunish Theater in Portland. These shows will run from Dec. 13 through 22, also with 7 p.m. evening shows and 2 p.m. matinees on Saturdays and Sundays, but no evenings on Sundays. Advance tickets range from $15.75 to $28.50. Richardson explained that there is no real difference between the preview performances and the main shows, but that the previews will be in Vancouver and are part of MPA’s ongoing effort to bring more community theater to the city and the county.  Caroline Gienapp is seen here in her costume for her role as Snoopy in MPA’s “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” Photo courtesy of Metropolitan Performing Arts Caroline Gienapp is seen here in her costume for her role as Snoopy in MPA’s “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” Photo courtesy of Metropolitan Performing Arts  MPA is a, “Vancouver based nonprofit academy and community theater that offers professional, technique driven classes in acting, dance, music and tech.” The organization has a wide range of programs, including the popular “Re-Imagined Radio” which is performed at the historic Kiggins Theatre. “I love how Charlie Brown isn’t your typical at Christmas hero. But yet, when we think of Christmas, we think of Charlie Brown,” Richardson said. “In the end, you know, it’s really about forgiveness, and it’s about community coming together and putting aside their differences. They might think this tree that Charlie Brown picked out isn’t the best tree, but they decorate anyway, and they sing a song together in harmony and peace. That’s what Christmas is all about.”Poster courtesy of Metropolitan Performing Arts Poster courtesy of Metropolitan Performing Arts Tickets are on sale now, and the matinee performances have almost all sold out. The MPA Theater in Vancouver seats 100 and The Brunish Theater in Portland seats 146. Richardson said this is the first year The Brunish has been available at Christmas time, and thus the company jumped on the opportunity.Find more information online or on the Metropolitan Performing Arts Facebook page. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : Fence mending a top priority for city council-elect in Battle Ground Next : View Ridge Middle School STEM Class builds and races dragstersAdvertisementThis is placeholder text guestLabel 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all commentscenter_img Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). guestLabel I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreelast_img read more

Collaboration Between CU-Boulder, Boulder Valley Schools Wins Award

first_img Published: April 15, 1998 A University of Colorado at Boulder program that brought college students and architects into Boulder Valley middle schools to teach architecture has won the 1998 Award of Excellence and Innovation from the American Association for Career Education. In a collaborative effort between the Boulder Valley School District and CU-Boulder, architect Kim Saporito led teams of graduate and undergraduate architecture majors in developing an architecture curriculum for use in middle school applied technology classrooms. Formerly known as “shop,” the classrooms provide exploratory, hands-on, career-oriented activities for students. CU-Boulder students refined the curriculum over a three-year period (1995-1997), and some version of it is in use in all of the district’s 12 middle schools. The curriculum involves a four-level sequence of activities, designed to challenge students at different levels. Activities range from a “starter” program that teaches the simplest foundations of architecture to a “capstone” activity in which the most motivated and gifted students have the opportunity to complete advanced sketch models, conduct space planning and design an open-ended “adventure center.” Saporito said university students worked closely with classroom teachers and students from diverse communities to bring authenticity, accountability and motivation to each task. “Our goal was to give students a sense of the beauty, the real work and the community-building nature of architecture,” she said. Instructional technology director Len Scrogan, who coordinated the project for the school district, noted that the development of a curriculum ensures that the learning activities will be available to students year after year. Other educators involved in the program included Greg Peters, Jeff Leonard, Ken Sherman, Sheryl Arndt, Mike Dreeger, Abe Maestas, Don Haywood, Jill Lester, David Clark, Brian Kane, Gil Blea, Mike O’Neill, Scott Dixon and Ray Mueller. The program was one of three career initiatives nationally to catch the eye of AACE this year. The other winning programs are based in Ohio and Texas. “These programs represent the current focus on exemplary career education,” said AACE President Pat Nellor Wickwire. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Spring Town Hall addresses campus climate, funding – provides community conversation point

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: April 1, 2015 More than 350 students, faculty and staff joined the 2015 Spring Town Hall on the CU-Boulder campus today. Whether attending in-person or watching via streamed video, the audience heard directly from the campus’ top leadership, including Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano, Senior Vice Chancellor and CFO Kelly Fox and Provost Russell Moore.Moderators were CUSG executive Juedon Kebede and CU-Boulder Professor and Director of the Environmental Studies Program Sharon Collinge, who led the panel in a discussion on topics ranging from the campus culture and climate, to student success and future funding of the institution.Following the discussion, leadership also answered questions from the audience and some which were emailed previously. The answers covered topics ranging from the faculty and staff tuition benefit, online education and investment in athletics facilities balanced with academic and student space.When asked about student success and what it means to him, DiStefano said, “I want to see us graduate 80 percent of our students within six years by 2020, and I want them to leave with a degree and hopefully very little debt,” for which he received a round of applause.Moore identified a number of initiatives underway on campus to help our students succeed, including an updated approach to new student orientation.“We’re taking a multi-faceted approach. We’re taking pages from the best practices from other universities, and we’re trying to implement them in a coordinated fashion across the campus,” said Moore.Moore said the new process will be more technology-assisted and high-touch so that we can make it easier for students to enroll and become engaged on campus.Moore also pointed to a new, campuswide approach to academic advising and a faculty mentorship program as other exciting initiatives that the university is undertaking to support student success.The panelists discussed the recent Board of Regents vote to raise resident tuition by 2.9 percent, as well as the broader topic of the university’s funding from the state, tuition and other forms of revenue. DiStefano expressed his gratitude to the state Legislature for the continued support, but emphasized that CU-Boulder must be serious about actively seeking alternative sources of revenue.“We have other ways of increasing revenue besides state funding and tuition,” DiStefano said, “let’s be innovative and entrepreneurial and aggressive and continue to identify ways to increase revenue so that we can offset any of the loss of revenue from the state.”DiStefano said the campus has already been doing well on that front.“We’ve raised an additional $10 million this year through private fundraising, industry research, and other sources. We’re continuing to identify new ways to generate more revenue.”Fox addressed how the campus sets current fiscal priorities.“We put together a strategic budget process a couple years ago, so that really has brought all the leadership together to help identify what the priorities for investing are. The first priorities for fiscal year 2016 include investing in faculty and staff salaries with a compensation pool of 3 percent. Other investments are around our enrollment initiatives and retention strategies, and we are addressing deferred maintenance to some our very aging facilities and we need to take a very strategic approach to how you start investing in these issues.”Moore explained that there are three primary considerations given to any financial decision: will it enhance our reputation as a great national research university, will it promote student success, and will it help us create alternate revenue sources.DiStefano reminded the group that while athletic fundraising for new facility upgrades was exceeding $70 million, “we have invested $850 to 860 million in the last five to 10 years in our academic and student space, and we don’t talk about that enough. We’ve added 2 million square feet in the last eight years.”Moore also discussed the shifting of departments from main campus to the newer buildings on the East Campus.“Departments are not moving out there in silos,” he said. “They are in these buildings and collaborating and acting in an interdisciplinary way.”The trio also discussed an interdisciplinary approach to student success, and new student welcome, as keys to increasing future graduation rates and the diversity on campus.In closing, the Chancellor discussed the new panel discussion format, “One of the things that I wanted to accomplish with this format is for our faculty, staff and students to see how we work together as a team… It’s really a team approach how we work together, how we improve the campus, get ideas from across the campus, and move our campus forward.”For those unable to attend the event, a recording of the livestream is available online. Follow-up questions are always welcome at [email protected], and the organizers would love to hear your feedback on the new panel format. If you sent a question and it was not answered at the Town Hall, please look for a personal response in the coming days.last_img read more

Principal of the Year has no regrets about entering the classroom

first_imgAdvertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Teaching was not her first choice of a profession, but 2010 LASCO/Ministry of Education Principal of the Year, Pauleen Reid, has no regrets about her decision to enter the classroom.Principal of the Year, Pauleen Reid, of Holland High School, in Trelawny, proudly displays her trophy, which was presented to her during the LASCO/Ministry of Education Teacher and Principal of the Year Awards 2010/11, held recently at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in New Kingston.“As a teenager I had an interest in banking because I was fascinated with the uniform of one financial institution,” she recalls.However, it was at the urging of her mother that she chose her current career and has not looked back since. “If I had to re-live my life, teaching would still be my chosen profession,” Mrs. Reid tells JIS News during an interview.With 23 years of dedicated service to the teaching profession, and various accolades for innovative teaching practices, she says she finds greatest satisfaction in “the kind expressions of gratitude and admiration I receive from past students. I have never experienced any hostility from these students, just genuine affection.”Mrs. Reid is hailed as a visionary in the field of education. She has demonstrated tremendous proficiency and best practice in the field of education and nation building.Acting on the philosophy that educators should be committed to developing a responsive environment sensitive to the unique characteristic of each age group,Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen (centre), with Principal of the Year, Pauleen Reid (second left), of Holland High School in Trelawny; and Teacher of the Year recipient, Pherone Griffiths (second right), of Spring Gardens Primary and Infant School, in Trelawny, during the LASCO/Ministry of Education Teacher and Principal of the Year Awards 2010/11, held recently at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in New Kingston. Also sharing in the moment are Executive Chairman of LASCO Affiliated Companies, Lascelles Chin (right), and Marketing Manager, LASCO, Anthony Chang.Mrs. Reid has instituted a number of student-centred programmes at the Holland High School in Trelawny which she heads, that have helped to improve academic achievement.She has piloted a weekend retreat or residential camp for students sitting the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examinations and has established academic clubs, a reading centre, reading corners in each class, and a career centre.The educator has also created the concept of the board of excellence and merit charts. The celebrating excellence boards are mounted at the front and exterior of the school and contain photographs of students, who gain and exceed monthly averages of 80 per cent. The merit charts are displayed in each class, highlighting the outstanding performance of the students.She promotes logical thinking among her students, through the institution of an innovative debating programme, in which students from the various grades participate and attempt to win the approval of a panel. Cash prizes are awarded to the top debaters.Mrs. Reid is also credited with developing the school’s safety and development plan, the high school development plan, academic staff manual, among others.She tells JIS News that the students respond positively to the initiatives and as such “they have been doing exceptionally. We keep tabs on the value-added and so we have to work extremely hard to make sure that there is incremental improvement in all areas and this is very evident.”With all her accomplishments, it is no wonder that the Clarendon native was selected for the coveted LASCO award earlier this year. “I feel quite elated,” she tells >b>JIS News, noting that the award puts Holland High school on the map in a positive way.She also hails LASCO and the company head, Lascelles Chin, noting that “they are true patriots”.“They do not (just bemoan) the ills in the system, but rather finance an initiative aimed at fostering professional development, aimed at advancing school projects and keeping the educators motivated. In my book, LASCO is an acronym for Leaders Acknowledging Service and Commitment,” she says.Mrs. Reid attended the Vere Technical High school in Clarendon, and later the Shortwood Teacher’s College and the University of the West Indies in Kingston. She holds a Master’s Degree in education from the Central Connecticut State University in the United States.Institutions that have benefited from her teaching and educational management skills include Ocho Rios High, St. Ann; Frome Technical High, Westmoreland; and William Knibb High, Trelawny.The annual LASCO/Ministry of Education Teacher and Principal of the Year awards recognise and reward excellence in the teaching profession.Entrants are judged on their professional development, commitment to education, creative leadership and community involvement.The winning teacher and principal will each receive $100,000 from LASCO, a trophy, LASCO gift baskets and a trip to the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) Conference in the United States. 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