North Pole Council urges water-system expansion to help Moose Creek deal with tainted groundwater

first_imgAudio Playerhttp://media.aprn.org/2017/ann-20170719-09.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.The North Pole City Council unanimously passed a resolution in Monday’s meeting stating its support for expanding the city’s water system to Moose Creek.Mayor Bryce Ward said it’s the best long-term solution to providing drinking water to the community.“We just wanted to let (the) Air Force know that if this is something that the community is interested in, the city could be a viable option,” Ward said.Ward said expanding the water system is the best of seven alternatives outlined in an Air Force study of the groundwater contamination that’s spread from nearby Eielson Air Force Base.The study, which will be presented in a town hall meeting at the Moose Creek Fire Station, includes other alternatives, such as setting up tanks or water-filtration systems at each residence or business affected by the contamination.“Y’know, (over) the period of 30 years, that water delivery or the maintenance of a water-treatment filter system is quite a bit higher and quite comparable (cost), if you will, to that of a water system,” Ward said.The Air Force’s Interim Feasibility Study estimates to expand the system about four miles south to Moose Creek and maintain it over 30 years will cost $34 million to $40 million.Ward says that’ll provide water to 169 parcels in the area where two types of perfluorinated compounds have been found in groundwater at levels that could harm human health.“Although it is not necessarily the cheapest option, it provides the least amount of liability to those involved and affected, and the greatest security over that 30-year period and even longer,” Ward said.The Air Force will pay the estimated $25.3 million to build the system, Monte Garroutte said.He manages the state Department of Environmental Conservation’s Eielson contamination-remediation project.“The infrastructure and all that – yes, they’ll definitely be paying for that,” Garroutte said.Garroutte said the federal government probably will not pay for maintenance and operation of the expanded water system.He said once the Air Force and community come to an agreement on a drinking-water solution, the agency will then focus on cleaning up the contamination.“We still have to go through all the investigation and the feasibility study for the remediation as well, to determine what the possible solutions are,” Garroutte said.Ward said North Pole knows quite a bit about that process, because for years it’s had to deal with a bigger groundwater-contamination problem caused the leakage of sulfolane, an industrial solvent, from the Flint Hills refinery, which the company shut down in 2015.Ward said the city hopes to hire a contractor this year that, if all goes well, will begin work in the spring on a larger water-system expansion project for homes and business affected by the sulfolane contamination.That project is estimated to cost nearly $100 million, 80 percent of which will be paid-for by Flint Hills.The mayor said adding the second expansion to Moose Creek would enable the city to take advantage of the economies of scale that would result from both projects.Share this story: Environment | Interior | Local Government | Military | Public SafetyNorth Pole Council urges water-system expansion to help Moose Creek deal with tainted groundwaterJuly 20, 2017 by Tim Ellis, KUAC-Fairbanks Share:U.S. Air Force and New Jersey state fire protection specialists from the New Jersey Air National Guard’s 177th Fighter Wing battle a simulated aircraft fire with Aqueous Film Forming Foam at Military Sealift Command Training Center East in Freehold, N.J. on June 12. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman 1st Class Amber Powell/Released)Officials with the Air Force and other agencies are asking members of the public to weigh in on several proposals to provide drinking water to Moose Creek residents who can’t use their wells because of groundwater contamination.The pollution came from Eielson Air Force Base’s use of firefighting foam in years past.North Pole City Council members made it clear Monday that they believe expanding their municipal water system to Moose Creek is the best alternative.last_img read more

Joe Mallon Motors Car of the Week: 151 Ford Focus Zetec from €37 per week

first_img Joe Mallon Motors Car of the Week: 151 Ford Focus Zetec from €37 per week Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous article‘Star Nation’ competition gives Laois musicians a chance of successNext articleSelector Fitzgerald believes Dublin win will inspire whole new generation of Laois hurlers LaoisToday Reporter SEE ALSO – Check out more great deals from Joe Mallon Motors TAGSJoe Mallon Motors Comments3x3point rear seat beltsAdjustable seatsAdjustable steering column/wheelAir ConditioningAlloy WheelsArmrestAuto LightsAuxiliary Jack InputBluetooth PhoneBody Coloured Bumpers/MirrorsCD MultichangerCD playerCentralised lockingChild LocksCloth seat trimCruise ControlCurtain AirbagsDriver AirbagDriver Knee AirbagElectric MirrorsElectric WindowsExtended WarrantyFoglightsFront Electric WindowsFront Fog LightsFull Service HistoryHands Free KitHeat preventing glassHeated screenHeight adjustable drivers seatISO FixImmobilizerMP3 ConnectionMedia ConnectionMetallic PaintMulti-Function Steering WheelMultiple AirbagsOutside temperature meterPassenger AirbagPassenger Knee AirPower SteeringPrivacy GlassRear headrestsRemote Central LockingRemote locking with key cardRepair history availableSide AirbagSide Impact ProtectionSplit Fold Rear SeatsTraction ControlTraction controlUSBiPod ConnectionABS WhatsApp Facebook This week’s Car of the Week from Joe Mallon Motors is a 151 Ford Focus Zetec.With a finance option in place, this car could be yours from €37 per weekThis is another Exceptional Offer From JOE MALLON MOTORS.Why buy from Joe Mallon Motors? Confidence, peace of mind, reassurance.SummaryThese are the virtues of buying an Approved Used Car because every car has or is supported by:Multipoint inspectionComprehensive reconditioningvaletingMileage verificationVehicle validation checkFinance Packages available subject to terms and conditionsOver 31 Years’ experience selling used vehicles. Twitter Pinterest GAA Facebook GAA WhatsApp Home Sponsored Joe Mallon Motors Car of the Week: 151 Ford Focus Zetec from… Sponsored GAA Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Twitter Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory By LaoisToday Reporter – 11th July 2019 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

Discrimination against Persons with Disabilities should be made Unconstitutional – Munroe

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedDiscrimination against Persons with Disabilities should be made Unconstitutional – Munroe FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Government Senator, Professor Trevor Munroe has suggested that discrimination against persons with disabilities or health reasons should be made unconstitutional.Speaking in the Senate on January 26, Senator Munroe said this would provide a legal foundation for other statutes, including the proposed legislation dealing with occupational health and safety or the Labour Relations and Industrial Disputes Act.“I agree that some modification in our legal framework, perhaps in the occupational health and safety law which is being developed or otherwise needs to be made, in order to ensure that discrimination does not take place on grounds of health at the workplace,” said Senator Munroe.Professor Munroe’s suggestion came during a debate on a motion put forward by Opposition Senator, Dwight Nelson, which called on the Government to amend the Labour Relations and Industrial Act to make the practice of screening persons for HIV/AIDS, as a pre requisite for employment, illegal.State Minister in the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, Senator Floyd Morris said he commended Senator Nelson for moving such a motion in the Senate.“I want to commend the mover of this motion for bringing what is a serious issue, when it comes to the workers within the Jamaican society. We cannot facilitate the discrimination against any of our citizens, especially in the context of a particular disease,” informed the State Minister.Senator Nelson pointed out that the Jamaica Employers Federation and the trade union movement had signed a Memorandum of Understanding declaring that people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS are entitled to the same rights, benefits and opportunities as people with serious or life threatening illnesses. He also added that the memorandum also states that, “management should not require HIV screening as part of the pre-employment or general workplace physical examinations”.“Employment discrimination is the worse form of social and workplace discrimination. Broad based mandatory testing of prospective employees for HIV/AIDS threatens fundamental principles and rights at work and undermine efforts for prevention and care,” said Senator Nelson.However, he noted that there might be occupational situations where medical testing for employment is preferred, such as situations where “body fluids can contaminate whatever is produced”. Discrimination against Persons with Disabilities should be made Unconstitutional – Munroe UncategorizedJanuary 29, 2007center_img RelatedDiscrimination against Persons with Disabilities should be made Unconstitutional – Munroe RelatedDiscrimination against Persons with Disabilities should be made Unconstitutional – Munroelast_img read more

Vietnam approval of new Australian biosecurity facility bears fruit for growers

first_imgVietnam approval of new Australian biosecurity facility bears fruit for growers The Hon David Littleproud MPMinister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency ManagementVietnam to receive produce from new Melbourne irradiation facility Australian horticultural exporters to Vietnam now have access to two onshore irradiation facilities which will increase speed to market and decrease export freight costs for farmers in southern growing regions.In some cases, Australian fruit will be arriving in Vietnam just 72hrs after picking.Agriculture Minister David Littleproud said Vietnam has provided interim approval to receive produce from Australia’s newly established Merrifield irradiation treatment facility in Melbourne.“This will enable increased trade of table grapes and cherries and reduce transport costs for producers in southern Australia,” Minister Littleproud said.“Vietnam already receives produce from the Brisbane treatment facility and Australian farmers have exported over 10,000 tonnes of premium fresh produce to Vietnam through the Brisbane facility since its approval in 2016.“Approval to receive produce from Melbourne opens up more market access opportunities for growers in a key emerging market.“It also supports our ambitions to grow bilateral trade in horticulture commodities.“Vietnam and Australia have worked closely to expand the use of irradiation as an effective and safe biosecurity treatment.“Irradiation is becoming a preferred treatment for many exporters due to its speed, capacity and ability to maintain the quality of product.“It is a chemical-free and heat-free process helping Australia continue to deliver sustainable, safe fresh produce.“Vietnam is a very important trading partner for Australia.“Our bilateral and agricultural trade relationship has been built over many years and reflects the important trade in agricultural goods, as well as our valuable bilateral cooperation.”Fast FactsIn Australia phytosanitary irradiation is used to prevent the spread of pests like fruit fly.The same treatment technology plays other important roles including protecting the Australian honey bee population from pests and disease. The treatment helps maintain shelf life and quality of fresh produce by replacing existing cold and fumigant-based treatments. In 2019-20 Australia exported $142.2 million of horticulture to VietnamIncluding $39 million of table grapes and $10.8 million of cherries. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Australia, Australian, biosecurity, Brisbane, commodities, disease, Fast Facts, Government, horticulture, Melbourne, Minister, sustainable, technology, Transport, treatment, Vietnamlast_img read more

Good riddance to bad rubbish

first_imgGood riddance to bad rubbish On Clean Up Australia Day this year residents took up the call to look after our Region and make sure that rubbish makes it to the right place.Waste and Waste to Resource Implementation Councillor Shane Latcham said it was fantastic to see how many community groups organised a site, and how many people stepped up to clean up.“On Sunday 7 March I had the opportunity to visit a few different sites and pitch in,” Cr Latcham said.“This was my first Clean Up Australia Day as a Councillor, and I felt grateful and proud to be able to support this wonderful community event.“It struck me that so many people were willing to roll up their sleeves on a Sunday morning and do something really positive for our Region.“While this event might only take place once a year, I know that it’s the same passion that drives our community to make responsible decisions about waste every day, which is something I really want to take this opportunity to highlight and celebrate. Thank you to all of the schools, organisations, and individuals who got involved.“Of course the goal for our community is to reach a point where there’s no longer any litter to clean up, and at Council we’re currently looking at ways to reduce littering and illegal dumping in our Region. This project is proudly supported by the Queensland Government.“The vision for Council’s Waste Strategy is to become a zero waste community by 2050, and events like this are a wonderful reminder that we can achieve some pretty incredible results. So, let’s all work together to make sure that our Region remains stunning.“If you’re looking for some ways that you can make good decisions about waste every day I suggest heading over to our website and exploring some practical tips for recycling right, reducing food waste and composting.”Head to www.rrc.qld.gov.au/rrwr /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australia Day, community, council, food, Government, local council, project, Queensland, recycling, Rockhampton, Rockhampton Regional Council, visit, websitelast_img read more

Campus Q&A: The scholarly approach of prize-winner Sarah Krakoff

first_imgIn her 22 years at Colorado Law, Sarah Krakoff has emerged as a nationally recognized scholar in American Indian law and natural resources law. She applies her interdisciplinary scholarship to her teaching in creative ways that provide our students with transformative experiences in the classroom and outside it. Not only that, but Professor Krakoff’s work benefits our public lands and the underrepresented people who rely on them. We are exceedingly proud of Professor Krakoff and pleased she has received the prestigious Hazel Barnes Prize.” –Colorado Law Dean S. James Anaya Krakoff recently sat down with CU Boulder Today to reflect on and share her viewpoints about her work and how she engages with students and the campus community.How do you foster the interrelationship of student learning and scholarly research in your teaching?If my research is not relevant to my students, then it probably is not that interesting to anyone! The best scholarly research should also engage and enliven teaching.I test out new research ideas by discussing them with students in class or office hours. Also, I incorporate aspects of my research into seminars and encourage students to work on papers that build on ideas we develop together. Whenever possible, I urge students to try to publish their papers as well, with the goal of multiplying our efforts and making research and scholarship a community enterprise to the extent possible.What do you most want to impress upon your students?I want them to understand the power they will wield as lawyers. And I want them to understand how law historically has shaped relations between human communities, and also between humans and the non-human world. If they are not happy with the current state of affairs, they have to examine how law—the very tool they want to use to make things better—is also thoroughly implicated in all the ways things are not fair or just today.In short, I want them to be able to think critically about law and its role in our society but also to think imaginatively about how they might order things differently in their lifetimes.More broadly, how do you engage with the CU Boulder community?There are so many amazing scholars, teachers and institutional citizens on our campus. Through CU Engage, the Center of the American West, the Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies and more places than I can name in this short space, I encounter faculty and students doing exciting and deep work that also serves the public.In my own work, I try to make my scholarship count for the public by writing about topics relevant to underserved communities and doing public service projects that build on that research. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: April 13, 2018 CU Boulder last month named professor Sarah Krakoff the 2018 recipient of the Hazel Barnes Prize, the most distinguished award a faculty member can receive from the university.Among her distinguished work teaching students and being part of the CU Boulder faculty, Krakoff is an expert in American Indian law and natural resources. What are you most proud of?That is a tough one. I feel grateful every day to be able to do work that I care about. Maybe I still feel too young, despite what the calendar says, to register as “proud” of anything. But I do love hearing from former students that our experiences together mattered to them and from members of the public and practitioners that my work is meaningful and helpful to them.Also, pulling off the Law of the River seminar, a semester-long class that culminated in a two-week wilderness raft trip through the Grand Canyon, was pretty amazing. And I am thrilled every year when we recruit dozens of law students to work pro bono with low-income farmers in the San Luis Valley through The Acequia Project, which provides free legal assistance on water rights matters.What is your favorite thing about campus?I love the view of the Flatirons and try to be grateful for it every day. Also, the architectural style and the older buildings around Norlin; we really do have one of the most beautiful campuses west of the Mississippi.Anything else you’d like to mention?Charles Wilkinson (friend, role model and fellow Hazel Barnes recipient) gave me a copy of Hazel Barnes’s autobiography The Story I Tell Myself: A Venture In Existentialist Autobiography as a congratulations gift. I just started reading it and am in awe of her writing, intellect and passion for her work. It is humbling and inspiring to be associated with her legacy, and I hope I can live up to it. Categories:AcademicsCelebrateCampus Community Sarah Krakoff is highly respected in her field and on campus, where she has a long and impressive history as a scholar and community member. She has dedicated herself to indigenous communities and public lands, developed programs that help low-income populations and shared her knowledge with students in academically challenging and inspiring ways. Sarah is an exemplary Hazel Barnes Prize winner, and I congratulate her.” –Chancellor Philip P. DiStefanolast_img read more

Upgraded May Pen Fire Station Officially Opened

first_imgRelatedPrime Minister Golding Announces Cabinet Changes Upgraded May Pen Fire Station Officially Opened Office of the Prime MinisterSeptember 23, 2011 RelatedUpgraded May Pen Fire Station Officially Opened FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail KINGSTON — Firefighters at the May Pen fire station in Clarendon are operating from improved facilities, which will better enable them to carry out their job to protect lives and property. Through funds provided by the Department of Local Government, Central Clarendon Member of Parliament, Hon. Michael Henry, and the May Pen business community, the firemen laboured for more than two years to construct an administrative block, comprised of four offices, three bathrooms, storeroom and dining area. The project, which began in 2008 and was completed late 2010, was spearheaded by Custos of Clarendon, Hon. William Shagoury. The firemen have been using the facilities since January. At the official opening ceremony on Wednesday September 21, State Minister with responsibility for Local Government, Hon. Shahine Robinson, lauded the work done, which she said, demonstrated the value of community action. “This new administrative block, which we are opening today, was done through the bridge-building efforts of the men and women of the community, who care about the men and women of the Jamaica Fire Brigade,” she stated. The State Minister also highlighted the need for more community participation in the firefighting awareness programmes. These programmes, she said “are not devised only for our youth, schools and other agencies, they are also geared at our adults, particularly our parents and guardians.” Minister Henry, in his remarks, praised the firemen for “working to improve your own circumstance.” “By making your own contribution (you have) set an example for many to rally to help themselves rather than totally relying on Government. I congratulate you wholeheartedly,” he stated. Providing background to the project, Commissioner of the Jamaica Fire Brigade, Laurie Williams, said that during a monthly senior management meeting, the cramped working conditions at the May Pen fire station was the subject of discussion. “I challenged officers to work with staff and to present me with a workable plan to utilise the available land space to the benefit of the staff, members of the public, and the organisation,” he informed. Assistant Commissioner of the Brigade with responsibility for Clarendon, John Forrester, who co-ordinated the project, said that except for the roofing, which was contracted out, the improvement work was done by the brigade staff, assisted by friends. By Garfield L. Angus, JIS Reporter RelatedUpgraded May Pen Fire Station Officially Opened Advertisementslast_img read more

Samsung set for record Q2 on smartphone, component sales

first_img Tags Home Samsung set for record Q2 on smartphone, component sales US chip funding tipped to top $150B EC clears SK Hynix to acquire Intel memory assets AppleGalaxyIntelSamsung Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Previous ArticleChina Unicom to acquire spectrum from state agencyNext ArticleQualcomm calls on ITC to ban Apple iPhone sales Steve Costello center_img Related Author Samsung forecast a strong lift in Q2 operating profit, boosted by strong component sales as well as the successful launch of its latest flagship smartphone – Galaxy S8.In its official guidance, the company said it expects to report an operating profit around KRW14 trillion ($12.1 billion), compared with a Q2 2016 figure of KRW8.14 trillion, on revenue of KRW60 trillion compared with KRW50.94 trillion in the 2016 quarter.The Wall Street Journal said the figure is likely to mean Samsung edged Apple to become the most profitable technology company during the period. From a smartphone perspective, the companies are at a different point in their roadmaps, with Samsung offering a new flagship while Apple’s iPhone is mid-cycle.However, Samsung spent heavily marketing Galaxy S8, which is likely to have an impact on smartphone profitability.ComponentsPerhaps a bigger factor is that Samsung is benefitting from strong memory chip prices. Reuters said demand is likely to outstrip supply for these products for the rest of the year, boosting margins for suppliers.The South Korean company is also expected to supply OLED screens to Apple for its next-generation iPhones later this year, while its own Galaxy Note 8 is expected to boost smartphone sales and rebuild this part of Samsung’s portfolio following the Note 7 debacle.In addition to passing Apple as the most profitable tech company, it was suggested Samsung’s semiconductor sales may outstrip those of Intel during Q2.The company recently announced a big investment in its components business, which is a key driver for profitability.Samsung will provide a detailed breakdown of its performance when it releases its Q2 results later this month. Devices KT makes LG Electronics trade-in move AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 07 JUL 2017 last_img read more

Goosen, Grace chasing leaders at SA Open

first_imgJOHANNESBURG – Chris Paisley and Adrien Saddier opened up a big lead after two rounds of the South African Open on Friday as they moved to 13 under par and four shots clear of their nearest challengers. England’s Paisley shot 7-under 65 to move up from second overnight. France’s Saddier had the round of the day at Glendower Golf Club in Johannesburg, a blistering, course record-equaling 63 with an eagle, seven birdies and no bogeys. Both Paisley and Saddier are seeking a maiden European Tour title. Full-field scores from the BMW South African Open Home player Jacques Kruyswijk is alone in second at 9 under, with a group of four players another shot behind him at 8 under and in a tie for fourth. That group contains overnight leaders Branden Grace and Chase Koepka, Zimbabwe’s Scott Vincent, and Retief Goosen, the two-time U.S. Open champion who hasn’t won a professional tournament since 2009. The 48-year-old Goosen began this week with a promising 69 and then carded six birdies and an eagle for his 5-under 67 in the second round. It could have been even better if not for a bogey on No. 13 and a double bogey on the last. Ernie Els, a five-time winner of the South African Open, made the cut after a 70 moved him to 3 under. Defending champion Graeme Storm missed the cut by a shot, though, thanks mainly to his opening-round 75.last_img read more

Leaney (65) leads Langer by 1 at Chubb Classic

first_imgNAPLES, Fla. – Stephen Leaney leads after Saturday’s second round at the Chubb Classic, and Fred Funk is two shots back as he attempts to become the oldest competitor to win a PGA Tour Champions event. Leaney made an eagle on the 17th hole and has posted consecutive rounds of 65, putting him one shot ahead of Bernhard Langer and two clear of Funk, Chris DiMarco and Fred Couples. “I played well the last two days,” Leaney said. “I have been driving it great, hitting a lot of very good iron shots. And suddenly started to make some putts, which I didn’t really do last year. So just try to keep it going tomorrow.” Leaney’s 130-shot total is his best 36-hole score at a PGA-sanctioned competition. His last pro win was at the 2017 Western Australian Open, and his only appearance in a Sunday final group on the PGA Tour was at the 2003 U.S. Open, when he started three shots behind eventual champion Jim Furyk. “I mean, I have won over 16, 17 times in the world,” Leaney said. “I mean, I have won tournaments before. No problem in this position. So it’s all about controlling yourself. I can’t control what anyone else does.” At 63 years, eight months and two days old, Funk would be the oldest winner ever on the tour, surpassing Scott Hoch at 63 years, five months and four days. “That’s unbelievable,” Funk said. “That would be awesome. Although that will be broken once Bernie gets to be 63, so I might as well get it.” Full-field scores from the Chubb Classic Funk’s two-round total of 132 is his best since the 2017 Regions Tradition, and that was also the last time he started the final round of an event in the top three. He finished tied for fourth. He hasn’t won a PGA Tour Champions event since the 2014 Bass Pro Shops Legends of Golf with partner Jeff Sluman. He’s made 145 individual starts since his last solo victory at the 2012 Greater Hickory Classic. Funk has dealt with back and nerve pain recently and said he had to push through the latter Saturday. “My back is overall a lot better,” he said. “I usually don’t have the nerve pain. Today that nerve pain fired up again on 13, for some reason, going right down my hip and into my leg. And killing me right now. But it’s been a lot better. It’s been a lot more functional. “When I had that nerve pain the last two years, it completely shut me down. And I’m scared to death of it, because I know what it means if it pops back up. So I don’t want it to come back. I can play with pain, I can’t play with that nerve pain.” Langer is a three-time winner at the Chubb Classic, last in 2016. He shot 5-under 66 in the second round, sending him into Sunday among the top-five at this tournament for the 10th time in 12 starts. A year after posting a course-record 9-under 62 in the second round at the Chubb Classic, Kevin Sutherland shot a bogey-free 63 and jumped into a tie for sixth place.last_img read more