New Zealand vs Bangladesh 3rd Test cancelled after mosque shootings in Christchurch

first_img India Today Web Desk ChristchurchMarch 15, 2019UPDATED: March 15, 2019 13:04 IST Bangladesh cricket team was arriving for prayers when the shooting occurred (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSA gunman opened fire at two mosques in Christchurch on FridayBangladesh cricket team was arriving for prayers when the shooting occurredAll members of the cricket team managed to safely return to their hotel, BCB confirmedThe third Test match between New Zealand and Bangladesh has been cancelled after players and members of the support staff of the visiting team had a narrow escape in the Christchurch mosques shooting on Friday.New Zealand cricket board and its Bangladeshi counterpart took a joint decision to cancel the match which was scheduled to start on Saturday.”Our heartfelt condolences go out to the families and friends of those affected by the shocking situation in Christchurch. A joint decision between NZC and the @BCBtigers has been made to cancel the Hagley Oval Test. Again both teams and support staff groups are safe,” New Zealand cricket tweeted.Our heartfelt condolences go out to the families and friends of those affected by the shocking situation in Christchurch. A joint decision between NZC and the @BCBtigers has been made to cancel the Hagley Oval Test. Again both teams and support staff groups are safe.BLACKCAPS (@BLACKCAPS) March 15, 2019New Zealand media reported that between nine and 27 people were killed, but the death toll could not be confirmed. Police said multiple fatalities had occurred at two mosques, but it was unclear how many attackers were involved.Witnesses told media that a man dressed in a military-style, camouflage outfit, and carrying an automatic rifle had started randomly shooting people in the Al Noor mosque.For so long I’ve watched world events from afar and naively thought we were somehow different in our little corner of the world, somehow safe. Today is a terrible day. Disgusted and saddened doesn’t begin to describe it.advertisementJimmy Neesham (@JimmyNeesh) March 15, 2019The Bangladesh cricket team was arriving for prayers when the shooting occurred but all members were safe, a team coach told Reuters.”They were on the bus, which was just pulling up to the mosque when the shooting begun,” Mario Villavarayen, strength and conditioning coach of the Bangladesh cricket team, told Reuters in a message. “They are shaken but good.””All members of the Bangladesh Cricket Team in Christchurch, are safely back in the hotel following the incident of shooting in the city. The Bangladesh Cricket Board is in constant contact with the players and team management,” the Bangladesh Cricket Board confirmed on social media.For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byrohan sen Tags :Follow New Zealand vs BangladeshFollow Christchurch shootingFollow New Zealand Christchurch shootingFollow New Zealand mosquesFollow mass shooting at mosques New Zealand vs Bangladesh 3rd Test cancelled after mosque shootings in ChristchurchNew Zealand vs Bangladesh 3rd Test: New Zealand cricket board and its Bangladeshi counterpart took a joint decision to cancel the match which was scheduled to start on Saturday.advertisementlast_img read more

CSIRO calls for new Australian lithiumion battery recycling industry

first_imgAustralia should add lithium-ion battery recycling to its hardrock mining and processing expertise, according to a report from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation.The report, ‘Lithium battery recycling in Australia’, says the country could lead the world in battery recycling and re-use, tackling its annual 3,300 tonnes of lithium-ion battery waste in the process.This waste is growing 20% each year as consumer demand for portable and rechargeable electronic equipment and electric vehicles accelerates. As it stands only 2% is recycled – all of which happens overseas.The report estimates  Australia is losing out on between A$813 million and A$3 billion of value based on current day commodity prices from not recycling the batteries. That is down to the valuable cobalt, lithium, base and other metals and graphite that could be reused.And, the waste problem is getting worse. At the 2016 rate of generating 3,300 t of waste, the amount could exceed 100,000 t by 2036.“Low battery recycling rates can be overcome through better understanding of the importance of recycling, improved collection processes, and by implementing ways to efficiently recycle materials,” CSIRO’s report said.An effective recycling industry could also stabilise global lithium supplies to meet consumer demand, according to the report.It estimates that, if recycled, 95 % of components can be turned into new batteries or used in other industries. In comparison, of the 150,000 t of lead-acid batteries sold in 2010, 98 % were recycled.As it stands, the majority of Australia’s battery waste is shipped overseas, with the waste that remains left in landfill. This leads to potential fires, environmental contamination, and risk to human health.CSIRO research is supporting recycling efforts, with research underway on processes for recovery of metals and materials, development of new battery materials, and support for the circular economy around battery reuse and recycling.CSIRO battery research leader Dr Anand Bhatt said: “As a world leader in the adoption of solar and battery systems, we must responsibly manage our use of lithium-ion technology in support of our clean energy future; CSIRO has set out a pathway to do this.“The value for Australia is three-fold. We can draw additional value from existing materials, minimise impact on our environment, and also catalyse a new industry in lithium-ion re-use/recycling.”Dr Bhatt and his team are working with industry to develop processes to support the transition to domestic recycling of lithium-ion batteries.“The development of processes to effectively and efficiently recycle these batteries can generate a new industry in Australia. Further, effective recycling of lithium batteries can offset the current concerns around lithium security,” he said.last_img read more